Grand Canyon University Loan Forgiveness

Many Grand Canyon University Students Qualifying For Student Loan Forgiveness

Grand Canyon University is a for profit college specializing in higher learning that offers a variety of degrees in business administration, accounting, nursing, and other fields. Their commercials promise you a flexible education online. What the commercials don’t tell you is how much student debt that the average Grand Canyon University student has when they graduate

“When I signed up for Grand Canyon University I was really excited. I wanted to become an nurse. I didn’t hesitate to take out student loans because I figured I would be getting a high paying job as a nurse. I took out over $30,000 in student loans.

The education was fine, but I really wasn’t prepared at all for the realities of getting a job in nursing. Now I have massive amounts of debt. I can’t buy a new car, nobody is hiring me and I get embarrassing calls about paying back my student loans…

“I thought that I was going to be a nurse now I am in so much debt I can’t buy a car and I stay up crying thinking about how I’m going to give my kids a better future.”

What Can You Do About It

If you or a loved one who went to Grand Canyon University is currently experiencing financial hardships because of overwhelming student loan payments you’re not alone.

Millions of Americans have fallen victim to unmanageable student loan debts from for profit schools. This is not unlike what happened with the financial mortgage meltdown of 2008. According to The Federal Reserve 37 million Americans currently have student loan debt.

The good news is that the American government has recently passed laws that will give millions of Americans currently struggling with student loan debt much needed relief.

So what options do the students who are feeling angry, abandoned, helpless have at this moment?

There is help to uncover the options available. Options which include lowering your student loan payment and portions of your loans being forgiven. While Grand Canyon University may have left their students feeling stranded and helpless, there are choices those students can make to get to where they want to be in their educational and financial future. Call us at (844) 692-6684 to see if you qualify for loan forgiveness.

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Loan Forgiveness – Sanford Brown College and Institution Closing Its Doors

Sanford Brown College and Institution Closing Its Doors

As you may have heard by now, if you are a student attending any one of the Sanford-Brown Institutes or Sanford-Brown Colleges, your educational and even financial future could be looking cloudy. With the Career Education Corporation’s (CECO) recent announcements, this could mean that many students will be left hanging, shrugging their shoulders and wondering what to do next- that is, now that their college essentially doesn’t exist anymore…

But don’t panic yet… I will go over why in just a minute.

You can read the full press release here, straight from the Career Education Corporation. If you’d rather not, we did that for you and below we’ve provided a short summary along with what this could mean for the attending students of the College or Institution.

Last night, Sanford-Brown’s parent company, Career Education Corporation, announced their new strategy to point its resources and its focus specifically towards their regionally accredited Universities, which consists of Colorado Technical University (CTU) and American InterContinental University (AIU).

In order to help this re-focusing strategy, a teach-out process or discontinuation of Sanford Brown ground campuses and online programs has been called into action effective immediately.

This means that Sanford-Brown’s doors will slowly shut rather than slamming shut on students, faculty and staff.

But when it comes to those directly impacted…is there really a difference?

The Career Education Corporation released a full statement about their decision to move forward with a teach-out route, implying that a teach-out will “minimize the potential negative impacts on faculty, students and staff members.”

The teach-out will go into effect immediately over the 14 different Sanford-Brown Colleges, including Sanford-Brown online. Many of the full-time employees and students who have grown to trust the Institution, have already been released of their positions leaving students with more questions than answers.

The full teach-out or discontinuation of the institutions and colleges will take anywhere from 18 months to 3 years–yet there’s the lingering thought of how many students will truly stick with them when campus class offerings are cut due to limited resources and scheduling?

So what does the Sanford-Brown Teach Out Mean for Students?

Over 30,000 students are enrolled in the Sanford-Brown College Online division alone, but the Sanford-Brown group still holds 13 other properties in major cities across the United States, as well as 3 different Institutions. While the students that are about to graduate within the next year or so, may not see the change affect them as much, most students currently enrolled in the college or institution will.

Feel any better yet?

Some of you might…unfortunately, a larger majority are left feeling blindsided…abandoned…angry.

The teach-out of some Sanford-Brown Colleges or Institutions could be complete within the next year and half, if not less. For many students, that is only a mere portion of what they will need for a full college term in order to earn their degree. When the College and Institution’s doors do close on these students, what are they going to do…?

While Sanford-Brown campuses provide students with an array of programs, they come at a hefty price tag.  Students who attend Sanford-Brown accumulate an average of $65-$85K in student loan debt. This debt range is 2-3 times the cost of attending a public college or university. No doubt, the debt average of Sanford-Brown attendees is so high because it is a private, career-focused college.

If students don’t either seek a different way to get their degree or drop out completely, the underclassmen at Sanford-Brown campuses will undoubtedly continue to utilize federal student loan money, while inevitably being served a swift kick out the door.

Master Your Student Loan Debt.

Lower your payment or qualify for Student Loan Forgiveness Today

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Where will these students turn considering the people they grew to trust started to disappear from campus over a year ago and have continued through the announcement yesterday?

Many of the students impacted by this decision will have trouble finding employment in their niche field, either because they would not have finished their degree or because of the negative press this decision will have on how their degree is viewed by employers.

Yet, most students will be forced into repayment on their student loans if they drop less than half time and/or choose to discontinue their education during the “teach out process” regardless of whether or not they can afford to do so. They may find that many of their credits will not transfer to other colleges and feel trapped to accumulate more student loan debt.

Students have felt or already feel as though they don’t have to repay the loans because the school is closing…but in reality…they do and will have to start paying them back right away.

So what options do the students who are feeling angry, abandoned, helpless have at this moment?

There is help to uncover the options available. Options which include lowering your student loan payment and portions of your loans being forgiven. While Sanford-Brown may have left their students feeling stranded and helpless, there are choices those students can make to get to where they want to be in their educational and financial future. Call us at (844) 692-6684 to see if you qualify for loan forgiveness.

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Kaplan, Lincoln Tech Settle with Mass. Attorney General

Kaplan Career Institute and Lincoln Technical Institute have settled with the Massachusetts attorney general, Maura Healey, to resolve allegations of inflating job placement numbers and employing unfair recruiting tactics, Healey’s office said in a written statement. The settlement is part of Healey’s broad pursuit of the for-profit industry. Kaplan agreed to pay about $1.4 million to resolve the suit. Lincoln paid about $1 million. Most of the money will go to help eligible former students who attended the two for-profit chains to pay down their debt.

In a written statement, Kaplan, Inc., said it “emphatically maintains that its actions were compliant and in the best interests of students, who were well-served by the institution.” The settlement did not include a finding of wrongdoing, and Kaplan said it resolved the legal challenge “due to the high cost of protracted litigation.”

Lincoln Technical Institute and Kaplan Career Institute, both for-profit schools, will pay more than $2.3 million in a settlement with the Massachusetts Attorney General’s office, the AG’s office said Thursday.

The settlements were filed in Suffolk Superior Court, according to a news release from the AG’s office. Both schools had reported job placement rates from its vocational programs of more than 70 percent, but the actual job placement rates were much lower, the news release said.

“We allege these for-profit schools lured hopeful students into enrolling in their vocational programs by promising certain careers, but only left them with substantial debt,” said Attorney General Maura Healey in a prepared statement.

In a statement, Lincoln Technical Institute denied the AG’s allegations.

“Lincoln Technical Institute has been providing students with career-oriented skilled training for nearly 70 years. Our mission is clear: to provide a cost-effective quality education for each of our students with the hope that all of our gradutes obtain employment in their chosen field of studey. We know that perfection does not exist. Yet our 125 employees in the Commonwealth (and nearly 2,500 employees throughout the United States) work hard each and every day to try and fulfill this mission,” said Lincoln Technical Institute in a statement.

If you attended Kaplan or Lincoln Technical Insitute, call us at (844) 692-6684 or fill out the form below to see if you qualify for loan forgiveness.

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Feds investigating Univ. of Phoenix for possible unfair business practices

The University of Phoenix, an online college, is under investigation by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission for potential deceptive or unfair business practices, its parent company, Apollo Education Group, said Wednesday.

According to CNNMoney, Apollo must release sensitive documents regarding marketing, tuition, billing, accreditation, financial aid, fees, student retention and military recruitment practices, among other things, that go as far back as Jan. 2011.

The University of Phoenix has reportedly collected more than $488 million in tuition and fees for veterans, “a figure that dwarfs nearly every other institution identified as a GI recipient by the Department of Veterans Affairs.”

The federal government began tracking for-profit universities that recruit low-income students that qualify for large amounts of financial aid, leave them with debt that aggregates well after graduation and then makes repayment difficult.

CNNMoney reports that new federal rules were implemented on July 1 to hold universityies with career-training programs responsible for students’ returns on investment of their degree programs. This regulation has the potential to shut down roughly 1,400 schools.

According to the new rules, graduates annual loan repayments can’t exceed 20% of their discretionary income.

“The clock is ticking for bad actors in the career college industry to do right by students,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan told CBS News. “We know many have taken steps to improve or to close programs that underperform, but we believe there is more work to be done across the board so students get what they pay for: solid preparation for a good job.”

Industry officials, however, are claiming the allegations against them are unfair because “for-profit schools have expanded education opportunities to communities that wouldn’t otherwise have access.”

Apollo is reportedly evaluating the demand and intends to cooperate fully with the FTC.

Amidst the FTC claims, stock at Apollo has fallen 18%, student enrollment has been declining over the past five years and it has closed more than 100 campuses in recent years.

In the midst of this investigation, many students from the University of Phoenix are qualifying for loan forgiveness. Call us at (844) 692-6684 or fill out the form below to see if you qualify.

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Le Cordon Bleu – Cooking School Scam Fraud – $40 million dollar settlement

Recruiting for Student Loans Leads to $40 Million Settlement With Cooking School

Thousands of students who took out tens of thousands of dollars in student loans to attended San Francisco’s California Culinary Academy, one of 18 cooking schools in the Le Cordon Bleu for-profit college chain, may be getting some of their money back.

Under a pending $40 million settlement in state court, Career Education Corp., Le Cordon Bleu’s parent company, has agreed to offer rebates of up to $20,000 to approximately 8,500 students who attended the academy between 2003 and 2008.

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In a class-action lawsuit, former students of the cooking school accused it of misleading them about the value of a culinary education and their job prospects after graduation. The students alleged the for-profit school defrauded them with promises of high-paying jobs and encouraged them to take on crushing debt from student loans for expensive programs but provided them with no more chance of finding a high-paying culinary job than someone who didn’t go to culinary school at all.

Although the school’s website says 48 percent to 100 percent of graduates find work in their field of study or a “related field,” critics say that the school purposefully uses methodology that includes jobs that don’t pay much more than minimum wage and that don’t require a formal culinary education.

The academy’s tuition ranges from $21,000 for a certificate in pastry and baking arts to $43,000 for an associate degree in culinary arts, not including books, supplies, or room and board.

“They just oversold it and pushed it. They made misleading statements to lure you in,” said Emily Journey, 26, a plaintiff in the class-action lawsuit against the California Culinary Academy.

In 2004, Journey was convinced by academy recruiters to take out $30,000 in student loans to pay for a seven-month program in pastry and baking arts. After graduation, the only job she was able to find paid $8 an hour to work the night shift at a bakery in Oregon. It was a job that “anyone could have gotten without a culinary certificate,” Journey said.

Journey said she has abandoned her dream of opening her own bakery and will attend community college to become a nurse or dietitian. If the settlement money doesn’t come through, she said she’ll be paying for her culinary certificate for another 15 years.

“It is a ridiculous business decision to attend one of these schools,” said attorney Ray Gallo, who represents Journey and other plaintiffs suing the California Culinary Academy. “The whole thing doesn’t make economic sense. They know it and they don’t tell you”

There is help for students who have been defrauded by these kind of schools. Unfortunately, it is a wide spread problem which takes advantage of people who are truly trying to make a better life. These institutions have deep pockets and teams of lawyers making it impossible for the “little guy” to get justice. So you can level the playing field now by applying for loan forgiveness/discharge. If you have been defrauded by a school like this contact us at (844) 692-6684. There is help available, we must stop this for-profit school fraud and together we can.

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FOUR D COLLEGE: Technical school closes down suddenly

Students and workers at Four-D College found out Monday, July 13 that they were the latest to be affected by the closure of an Inland area technical college.

In the past year, six such colleges in the region have gone out of business, leaving students with incomplete educations and faculty and staff without jobs.

School officials were not on hand Monday at either of Four-D College’s two campuses, in Colton and Victorville. Phone and email messages left with owner Linda Smith were not returned.

A notice announcing the closure was taped inside the Colton school’s glass front doors. A short chain passed through the handles was padlocked.

In the parking lot outside the building, students and staff huddled in small groups. Most were seeking information on what to do next. Many were angry.

Carlos Gutierrez, 44, of Victorville, who finished a yearlong LVN program last week and was preparing for his exit exam in a week, called it “surreal.” He said the owners of the company should be prosecuted.

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“They saw this coming,” he said. “If they knew there was going to be an accident, they should tell us to put on our seat belts. That’s what pilots do when the plane is going down, right?”

Teresa Lara, 46, of Ontario said she worked as an admissions representative at the school. She said there were approximately 600 students and 200 employees at the two campuses.

The closure notice on the front door of the school also appeared on Four-D’s website. It said the Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools had begun refusing to accept Four-D’s job-placement figures for graduating students in 2011 and had pulled the school’s accreditation.

“Due to ABHES’ actions, the Institution’s Title-IV funding has been gravely effected (sic) and has made it impossible for the Institution to continue to operate,” the notice said.

Students and staff outside the school said they were unaware of such problems.

Michelle Allen, 47, of Loma Linda said she was both working and going to school at Four-D, studying medical billing and coding.

“There’s no problem being placed in medical billing and coding,” Allen said. “The class before my class, all except one was placed before their graduation date.”

Joneane Davis, who directed the school’s dental program, said 85 percent of her former students were working in the field.

Students did complain that some of the equipment used in their programs was shoddy, such as hospital beds that didn’t function properly, anatomical dummies that were worn out and stethoscopes that fell apart. But most seemed to feel they were getting the education they needed.

Davis spent the morning encouraging the students to continue that education at other colleges.

“I know it’s upsetting,” she told the students. “It’s upsetting for me. I’m out of a job. You’ve got to absorb it like a speed bump in the road. I just don’t want you to stop.”

At one point, the students joined hands in a circle and Davis’ husband, the Rev. Victor Davis, led the group in a prayer.

Due to the closure, federal student loans are now being forgiven. To verify your eligibility in the program, call us at (844) 692-6684.

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Loan Forgiveness Now Available for Full Sail University

Full Sail University is a for-profit entertainment media institution offering both on-campus and online degrees. The University’s education is accelerated, with its courses typically taking half the time of a traditional four-year college. Like many other for-profit college, Full Sail has high loan burdens and low graduation rates for its students.

For instance, the $80,000 video game art program graduated 38 percent of its students, who carried an average debt of nearly $59,000 in federal and private loans in 2008.

Many students feel that Full Sail University is a scam because of its high costs, low placement, and difficulties in transferring credits. Full Sail has generally been regarded more highly than many other institutions in the for-profit college industry as a whole, which has been the target of withering criticism in the last few years in the wake of federal investigations into fraudulent marketing practices, poor academic records and huge loans assumed by students ill-prepared for the expensive programs.

Call us at (844) 692-6684 to see if you qualify for loan forgiveness

Still, the school has attracted its share of criticism on Internet discussion boards and YouTube postings from its own students and alumni, with some alumni even deriding it as a “scam” because of what they described as high tuition, inadequate career training and difficulties in transferring credits to other schools.

Some of Full Sail’s 37 degree programs have suffered from high loan burdens and low graduation rates, data show.

David Halperin, who ran a liberal advocacy group focused on student issues, said “A school offering a program with a 14 percent on-time graduation rate is not a model for higher education in this country.”

If you are a current or former Full Sail University student and feel that you have been taken advantage of, take a minute to explain your situation via the email form on this page. Alternatively, you can call our office directly at (844) 692-6684.

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